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NEWS

Standard Line Blind Redesign

Many of Steinmans customers have special ordered line blinds with minimum thickness to be used as a simple yet essential safety device to block potential flow in a line during a shutdown or scheduled maintenance. Due to the volume of such special orders, Steinmans has redesigned the standard line blind also known today as the paddle blind, slip blind, spectacle blind, figure 8 blind, or spade blind to offer more safety features and benefits. Our safety spade blinds can be fabricated using virtually any type of material.

Blanking Line Blind

Steinmans blanking line blinds are truly a one piece construction. They are precision cut and follow very strict dimensional and thickness tolerance requirements. Steinmans' line blinds feature a redesigned handle that affords more safety during installation, use, and removal through the addition of a tagging hole for attachment of a safety tag. A safety flange check guide has been added to all line blinds, as well as an easy identification section that allows users to quickly check material of construction, flange class, pressure ratings. Steinmans' design introduces a special lock-out feature which allows line blinds to be locked-out when in use for longer durations. Steinmans new design is also lighter and more cost effective than the standard paddle blind.

Safety Blinds

Steinmans specializes in the design and fabrication of standard and custom blinds including paddle blinds, line blinds, and safety blinds for 100% safe isolation of piping and equipment. We manufacture blinds available in all different grades of metal including, stainless steel, carbon steel, Monel®, Inconel®, nickel alloys, Haselloy, chrome-molybdeum, aluminum, etc. Our safety spade blinds can be fabricated using virtually any type of material. If we don't have it in stock, we can get it!  Feel free to contact us if you have a special order request.

 

Steinmans Safety Line Blinds (a.k.a. Paddle Blinds, Slip Blinds, Skillet Blinds) VS. Blind Flanges

Many people may be uncertain what the difference is between slip blinds (also known as spade blinds, paddle blinds, skillet blinds, pancake blinds, etc.) and blind flanges.  If you are wondering which type of blind is better suited to your needs, you may find the following information about Steinmans' safety slip blinds vs. blind flanges useful.

Slip Blinds:
Slip blinds are used in process piping applications as a means of gaining a guaranteed temporary block of pipe flow in a non-energized system during shutdowns for line breaks or tank/vessel entries.  Sometimes during such shutdowns, valves can accidentally be left open, or they can leak even when in the closed position.  Slip blinds provide positive isolation and eliminate the possibility of equipment damage, environmental hazards, personal injury or death.  Unlike with blind flanges, pipes do not have to be completely separated to install slip blinds.  Slip blinds “slip in” because they are much thinner than blind flanges.  This makes slip blinds faster and easier to install than blind flanges – typically one person can install slip blinds with no additional pipe support needed.  Steinmans' safety slip blinds are also manufactured with a handle for even easier installation and removal, as well as for easy identification.

Blind Flanges:
In contrast to slip blinds, blind flanges are often used to close off the ends of piping systems on energized systems and are typically thicker than slip blinds to withstand greater pressure.  To use a blind flange, pipes must be completely disconnected at the flange, and full disassembly of the flange is required.  Additional pipe support may also be necessary.   More space is generally needed to install the blind flange because the pipes must be separated, and large pipes may be more difficult to separate due to weight and pipe configuration.  Furthermore, the blind flange is heavier due to its thickness, therefore often requiring more time and more people for installation.  Unlike slip blinds, blind flanges typically do not have handles, which may add to installation and/or removal difficulty.

View our official press release at Safety Line Binds vs. Blind Flanges.

 

Blind Flange vs. Steinmans Safety Spade Blind

Safety Spade Blind - Metal Markings

Standard Marking Change:
Steinmans, LLC would like to announce that effective today, March 11, 2010, our standard marking procedure on our blanking type paddle blinds has changed. Our blinds will be marked as follows:

  • Steinmans, LLC
  • Material of Construction
  • Flange Class
  • Pipe Size, NPS
  • Pressure Rating (*if applicable)
  • Model Number
  • Abbreviated Flange Class and Pipe Size (inverted)

* Our blanking spade blinds are not designed to be used in high temperature or pressure applications. They are to be used for temporary blocking only. Unless otherwise specified by the customer, all of our blinds will be laser etched with "Not Rated for Pressure".

Added Benefits:
One of the most noticeable marking changes on our paddle blinds is the addition of the abbreviated flange class and pipe size text (inverted marking). This marking is being introduced for added ease of identification. At Steinmans, we wanted to give our customers an added benefit for using our blinds vs. the competition. Therefore, we designed this text to be much larger and bold so blinds in use can be identified at a distance. The text was also inverted to make it easier to identify during storage and non use.

Finally, we added model numbers to each paddle blind, so that our customers can easily order similar blinds.

Spectacle Blinds vs. Paddle Blinds / Spade Blinds

At Steinmans, we often get the question:

"What is the difference between a spectacle blind and a paddle blind or spade blind?" 

Answer:

Spectacle Blind:
A spectacle blind - also known as a figure-8 blind - is generally a piece of metal that is cut to fit between two pipe flanges and usually sandwiched between two gaskets.  A spectacle blind is often made from two metal discs that are attached to each other by a small section of steel.  The shape is similar to a pair of glasses or "spectacles" – hence the name spectacle blind.  One end of the blind will have an opening to allow flow through the pipe during operation and the other end is solid to block flow during maintenance.  They are generally installed as a permanent device to separate process piping systems.

Paddle Blind:
A paddle blind - also known as spade blind, skillet blind, line blind, pancake blind, or slip blind - is basically the solid half of a spectacle blind.  A paddle blind is often made from one solid metal disc and will usually have a thin length of metal attached to one end to be used as a handle.  A finished assembly will resemble the shape of a paddle, hence the name "paddle blind".  Generally, these types of blinds are applied in piping systems that do not require constant maintenance.  The paddle blind is used more as a temporary blocking device to stop flow in a process piping system.  Optional paddle type spacers can be used in-line when returning the system to operation.

Other Differences:
Compared to paddle blinds, spectacle blinds often require a larger, more open area to install, remove, or change the blinds from the open to closed position.  In contrast, the paddle blind can be used in tighter spaces or where access is limited.  Spectacle blinds are also typically heavier in weight than the standard paddle blind, which may require rigging or lifting assistance during installation or removal.  Because of this, paddle blinds are more commonly used for larger pipe diameters.


SPECTACLE BLINDS VS. PADDLE BLINDS
Spectacle Blinds
Paddle Blinds
Usually installed as a permanant device. Usually installed as a temporary device.
Made from two metal discs attached by a small metal plate.  Looks like a pair of glasses or "spectacles". Made from one metal disk with handle.  Looks like a paddle.
One end allows pipe flow, the other end block flow. Primarily used to block flow only.  Separate matching spacers can be used during operation.
Requires open area to change from open to closed postion or to remove the blind. Can be used in tight spaces where access is limited. 
Heavier than a paddle blind.  Larger sizes require assisted lifting for installation. Lighter than a spectacle blind.  Often portable and easy to install.

 

We hope this answers the question.  Please feel free to leave us a comment or contact us if you need any more clarification or have any additional questions.  Visit our on the web @ www.steinmansllc.com.

Steinmans, LLC Introduces a New Blanking Line Blind Design

View our official press release at PRWEB.COM - NEW! Blanking Line Blind Design

Steinmans' blanking line blinds incorporate the functionality of a standard paddle blind while adding more safety and design features.

In the past, many of Steinmans' customers have special ordered line blinds with minimum thickness to be used as a simple yet essential safety device to block potential flow in a line during a shutdown or scheduled maintenance. Due to the volume of such special orders, Steinmans has redesigned the standard line blind - also known today as the paddle blind, slip blind, spectacle blind, figure 8 blind, or spade blind - to offer more safety features and benefits.

The following features of Steinmans' new blanking line blinds are listed in greater detail on Steinmans' website:

Steinmans’ blanking line blinds are truly a one piece construction. They are precision cut and follow very strict dimensional and thickness tolerance requirements. Steinmans’ line blinds feature a redesigned handle that affords more safety during installation, use, and removal through the addition of a "tagging hole" for attachment of a safety tag. A safety flange check guide has been added to all line blinds, as well as an "easy identification" section that allows users to quickly check material of construction, flange class, pressure ratings, etc. Steinmans’ design introduces a special lock-out feature which allows line blinds to be locked-out when in use for longer durations. Steinmans’ new design is also lighter and more cost effective than the standard paddle blind.

Great Customer Feedback on Our Spade Blinds!

A recent customer of ours gave us some great feedback about our line blinds. It was over the phone so I asked if he'd mind if I would share the information on our online news blog. He didn't mind, so here goes...

A couple of weeks ago a new customer of ours purchased a few of our blanking spade blinds for an upcoming shutdown. He had already purchased the majority of his paddle blinds from a different manufacturer and needed a few more. One of his associates found our website online and presented our design to him. He really liked our designs so he decided to give us a try.  During the shutdown both types of line blinds were used. The regular paddle blinds with a skinny solid handle and our paddle blinds with our custom safety handle. The customer loved our design because not only could he tag each blind with a danger tag, he also was able to run a chain through the handle of the blind and around the pipe or valve where it was being used. This served as an added safety feature for the line blind.

During the shutdown there was an safety incident. One of the "other type" paddle blinds, from a manufacture that we will not mention, was removed accidentally. Since the paddle blind had no markings or had no way of tagging the blind with a safety tag, a mechanic thought it was ok to remove the blind. Needless to say, the mistake was caught in time and no one was hurt. Each and every single one of our line blinds that we supplied were tagged with a danger tag and locked out with a chain and lock. Because of this, there were no safety issues with our blinds.

Our valued customer says, "Your blinds are great! You can tell there was a lot of thought put into the design. We love the added safety features and we absolutely plan on using your paddle blinds for all future shutdowns! Thank you." ~Edward B.

NEW! Safety Tagging Feature Added

You spoke and we listened! We now include tagging holes as part of our standard spade blind handle design!  Many of our customers have requested an additional "tagging hole" to be added to the handle of our spade blinds. This hole is used to attach a lock-out tag or identification tag to each line blind in use or on the shelf.  The tagging hole sizes range from 1/4in. diameter to 1/2in. diameter (for the larger spade blinds). We have integrated the tagging holes into our standard spade blind design and will be included as part of our fabrication process unless noted otherwise by customer request.

SPECIAL NOTE TO OUR VALUED CUSTOMERS:
We appreciate your feedback that you have given us! At Steinmans, we are constantly looking for ways to make our products better than our competition. We would like to thank you again for your input and suggestions. Your feedback is key to helping us meet your needs and ultimately helps us serve you better!


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